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Ship Name Histories - Database of histories of ship names beginning with letter E.

HMS Eclipse

The fifth ?ECLIPSE? was a 4-gun screw gun vessel, launched at Millwall in 1860.  She was of 700 tons, and 200 horse-power.  Her length, beam, and draught were 185ft., 28ft., and 8ft.   In 1863 the ?Eclipse,? commanded firstly by Commander Richard Charles Mayne and secondly by Commander Edmund Robert Fremantle, took part in the second New Zealand War in a squadron of ships under commodore Sir William Wiseman with his broad pennant in ?Curacoa.?  On June 4th the ?Eclipse? co-operated in an attack which was made by the garrison of New Plymouth on the rebel position at the mouth of the Katikara.  In October a Naval Brigade of 200 seamen under Commander Mayne landed, captured, occupied, and fortified the town of Merrimi.   On November 20th the Naval Brigade of 400 men, under Commodore Sir William Wiseman bombarded and assaulted the town of Rangariri, where the Maoris had strongly entrenched themselves.  Four separate assaults were repulsed by the brave defenders, two of which were made by the Naval Brigade under Commander Mayne.  On the following day the Maoris surrendered, the British forces having won a costly victory with a loss of 36 killed and 98 wounded.  The Naval Brigade losses were 5 killed and 10 wounded, among the latter being Commander Mayne, of the ?Eclipse,? who was promoted to captain for his services.    In January 1864 the ?Eclipse? proceeded to Waikato, and landed a detachment of men under Lieutenant William Fletcher Boughey to co-operate with the troops.  The town of Waikato was captured, and the Maoris were defeated at Rangioawhia, with a considerable loss in killed and prisoners.   In April 1864 the ?Eclipse? contributed to a Naval Brigade 430 strong, which joined the army under Sir Duncan Cameron.  On April 29th the combined forces proceeded to attack a Maori stronghold at Gate Pah.  The place was bombarded, and at 4.30 p.m. the Naval Brigade, under Commander Edward Hay, moved forward to the assault and entered the works.  Inside the pah the rebels fought with desperation, and the Brigade was obliged to retreat with a heavy loss.  The Maoris lost about 35 killed and wounded, but the British suffered 27 killed and 66 wounded, to which the Naval Brigade contributed 3 officers and 8 men killed or mortally wounded, and 3 officers and 19 men wounded.  The Naval Brigade behaved admirably, and withdrew only when nearly all its leading officers had been shot down. In 1867 this vessel was broken up.   The sixth ?ECLIPSE? was a 12-gun screw sloop, launched at Sheerness in 1867.  When laid down she had been called ?Sappho.?  She was of 1273 tons, 350 horse-power, and 10 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 212ft., 36ft., and 11ft.   In 1882 the ?Eclipse,? commanded by Captain Edmund St. John Garthforth, was engaged in the Egyptian War.  In August 1882 the ?Eclipse? contributed to a Naval Brigade which was disembarked at Suez.  The inhabitants understood that the town was in danger of being burnt, but the Naval Brigade, composed mostly of marines, occupied the town, and the Egyptian troops fled.  The ?Eclipse? was lent to the War Office in 1888, taken over again in 1892, and ended her career as a Naval ordnance mine depot at Plymouth.  The seventh ?ECLIPSE? is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Portsmouth in 1894.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 53ft., and 20ft.  This vessel became a sea-going training ship for Naval cadets.

HMS Eden

The first ?EDEN? was a 28-gun ship sloop, launched at Chester in 1814.  She was of 415 tons, and carried a crew of 150 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 108ft., 31ft., and 11ft.    In 1819 the ?Eden,? commanded by Captain Francis Erskine Loch, assisted by the ?Curlew? and ?Liverpool,? co-operated with the military in an expedition against the pirates of Ras-as-Khyma in the Persian Gulf.  The works were taken or destroyed, and all the piratical vessels in port were burned or sunk.   In 1833 this ship was broken up. The second ?EDEN? is a turbine torpedo-boat destroyer, launched at Hawthorn Leslie?s Yard in 1903.  She is of 555 tons, 7000 horse-power, and 25 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 220ft., 23ft., and 9ft.  Early in the morning of January 28th, 1910, this destroyer, while commanded by Lieutenant Oliver M. F. Stokes, broke away from her moorings in bad weather, and sank at the Harbour Jetty, under East Cliff, Dover.  She was got afloat again on January 30th.

HMS Edgar

The fifth ?EDGAR? was an 80-gun screw battleship launched at Woolwich in 1858.  She was of 5157 tons and carried a crew of 820 men.  600 horse-power gave her a speed of 11 knots, and her length, beam, and draught were 230ft., 55ft., 24ft.  For many years this ship acted as a quarantine ship at the Motherbank off the Isle of Wight, and in 1904 she was sold for ?5100.      The sixth ?EDGAR? is a 12-gun twin-screw launched at Devonport in 1890.  She is of 7350 tons, 12,000 horse-power, and 20.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 360ft., 60ft., and 24ft.  On November 13th, 1895, the ?Edgar? sent some men ashore to drill at Chemulpo.  Unhappily, while returning to the ship the launch capsized, and 48 men out of 71 were drowned.

HMS Egeria

The first ?EGERIA? was a 26-gun ship sloop launched at Bridport in 1807.  She was of 424 tons and carried a crew of 135 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 108ft., 30ft., and 11ft.  On December 21st, 1808, the ?Egeria,? commanded by Commander Lewis Hole, captured the French 10-gun vessel ?Noesois.?      On March 2nd, 1809, the ?Egeria,? commanded by Commander Lewis Hole, captured the Danish 6-gun vessel ?Aalborg.?   The ?Egeria? became a receiving ship at Devonport from 1825 until 1860.  She then became a police ship and acted as such until 1864, when she was broken up. The second ?EGERIA? was a 4-gun screw sloop launched at Pembroke in 1873.  She was of 940 tons, 1011 horse-power, and 11 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 160ft., 31ft., and 14ft.   In 1875 the ?Egeria,? commanded by Commander Ralph Lancelot Turton, proceeded to Perak, as one of a squadron of six ships under Captain Alexander Buller with his senior officer?s pennant in ?Modeste,? to take part in an expedition against the murderers of Mr. J. W. Birch, the British resident in Perak.  While the troops and a naval brigade advanced on the upper reaches of the Perak River simultaneously from two points, the ?Egeria? blockaded the Perak Littoral, and sent her boats up the Kurow River.  These boats destroyed or carried off some guns, arms, and ammunition  which might have been useful to the enemy.  Severe punishment was inflicted on the natives, but the actual murderers were not brought to account for some time afterwards.  This vessel acted for many years in the Surveying Service, and in November 1911 she was put up to public auction at Esquimalt, and sold to the Vancouver branch of the Navy League for ?1416.

HMS Egmont

The fifth ?EGMONT? was a 74-gun ship launched at Northfleet in 1810.  She was of 1760 tons and carried a crew of 590 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 176ft., 48ft., and 17ft.  In 1814 the ?Egmont,? flying the flag of Rear-Admiral Charles Vinnicombe Penrose, stood into the River Gironde with a squadron of 4 vessels.  Preparations for an attack on about 10 men-of-war having been made, the French saved the English the trouble by burning the vessels.  At the same time the various works commanding the river entered and destroyed by the seamen from the fleet under Captain George Harris.   After acting as receiving ship at Rio de Janeiro the ?Egmont? was sold in 1875. The sixth ?EGMONT? is a 16-gun broadside battleship, launched at Chatham in 1863 as the ?Achilles.?  She is of 9820 tons, 5720 horse-power, and 14,3 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 380ft., 58ft., and 27ft. This vessel went to Malta as receiving ship as the ?Hibernia,? but her name was subsequently changed to ?Egmont.?

HMS Emerald

The fifth ?EMERALD? was a 51-gun screw frigate launched at Deptford in 1856.  She was of 2913 tons and 600 horse-power.  Her length, beam, and draught were 237ft., 53ft., and 19ft.    In 1869 the ?Emerald? was sold for ?8900.     The sixth ?EMERALD? was a 12-gun screw corvette launched at Pembroke in 1876.  She was of 2120 tons, 2170 horse-power, and 14 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 220ft., 40ft., and 19ft.  In 1889 the ?Emerald,? commanded by Captain William Henry Maxwell, proceeded to the Solomon Islands to punish the natives for the murder of a boat?s crew belonging to the British schooner ?Sandfly.?  The murderers were then not discovered, but their villages were burned.  Some time later Bishop Selwyn persuaded the chief to surrender the ringleaders, who were duly executed.  This vessel ended her career as a powder hulk at Portsmouth, and in 1906 she was sold.  The seventh ?EMERALD? was a 9210-ton ship which had been launched at Glasgow as a broadside ironclad in 1862 under the name of ?Black Prince.? In 1903 her name was changed to ?Emerald,? and she acted for some years as training ship for the Irish boys at Queenstown.  Her name was again changed in 1910 to ?Impregnable III.,?  and she became merged into the boys training establishment at Devonport.

HMS Enchantress

The second ?ENCHANTRESS? was a paddle wheel despatch vessel, launched at Pembroke in 1862.  She was of 1000 tons, 1250 horse-power, and 14 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 220ft., 28ft., and 11ft.  In 1889 this vessel was sold.   The third ?ENCHANTRESS? was launched at Portsmouth in 1865, as the paddle-wheel despatch vessel ?Helicon.?  She was of 1000 tons, 1610 horse-power, and 14.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 220ft., 28ft., and 10ft.   Her name was changed to ?Enchantress? and she became the yacht of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in 1889.  In 1905 the vessel was sold for ?2675. The fourth ?ENCHANTRESS? is a twin-screw Admiralty yacht, launched at Belfast in 1903.  She is of 3470 tons, 6400 horse-power, and 18 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 320ft., 40ft., and 16ft. This ship is the special service vessel, or official yacht, of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in times of peace.  In war time she becomes a hospital ship.

HMS Encounter

The third ?Encounter? was a 14-gun screw corvette, launched at Sheerness in 1873.  She was of 1970 tons, 2130 horse-power, and 13 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 220ft., 37ft., and 17ft.   In 1873 the ?Encounter,? commanded by Captain Richard Bradshaw, took part in the Ashantee War.   In November the ?Encounter? contributed to a Naval Brigade under Captain the Hon.Edmund Fremantle, which marched inland to the relief of Abrakrampa, then sorely pressed by the Ashantees.  The enemy were seized with a panic and retired hastily, abandoning almost all their stores. On December 26th the ?Encounter,? bombarded a village on Alboaddi Point, and then sent her boats under Lieutenant Alfred Loveridge in to burn the place.    In 1875 the ?Encounter,? commanded by Captain Richard Bradshaw, was one of 7 ships which co-operated in a punitive expedition up the river Congo under Commodore Sir William Hewett with his broad pennant in ?Active.?  It was undertaken on account of the looting of the British schooner ?Geraldine? and the murder of four of her crew.   On August 31st the boats from the ?Encounter? and two other ships were towed to the entrance of Chango Creek.  One hundred and fifty marines were landed under Captain Bradshaw and succeeded in burning three villages, although they were fired at by natives concealed in the bush.  All the villages on the north bank were destroyed, and further punishment was inflicted in Luculla Creek and other places. The labours of the expedition were most arduous, some of the creeks being overgrown with luxuriant vegetation which had to be cut away to admit of an advance, and the country generally was very difficult.  Captain Richard Bradshaw was mentioned in despatches as having rendered conspicuous service, and the loss suffered was but 1 killed and 6 wounded.  In 1888 the ?Encounter? was sold.   The fourth ?ENCOUNTER? is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Devonport in 1903.  She is of 5880 tons, 12,500 horse-power, and 21 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 355ft., 56ft., and 21ft. In 1912 this ship was temporarily lent to the Australian government.

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